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Copyright by Inge Morath
© Kick Film
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AUTEUR(S)-RÉALISATEUR(S)

Sabine Eckhard

IMAGE

Martin Kukula

SON

Horst Zinsmeister

MONTAGE

Karin Nowarra

PRODUCTION / DIFFUSION

Kick Film GmbH, Bayerischer Rundfunk - BR

ORGANISME(S) DÉTENTEUR(S) ou DÉPOSITAIRE(S)

Kick Film GmbH

ISAN : non renseigné - en savoir plus
COMMENT VISIONNER CE FILM ?

Portrait d’Inge Morath, photographe pour "Life" et "Paris Match" et membre de l’agence "Magnum".

Inge came to photography rather by chance. But thanks to her extraordinary talent she became one of the leading photojournalists since the early fifties – for Life, Paris Match and as a member of the renowned photo agency Magnum. Born in Austria, she grew up in France and Germany and began working as a journalist in Salzburg and Vienna after World War II. Her story of homecoming German soldiers together with the photographer Ernst Haas drew Frank Capa’s attention, who had just founded Magnum in Paris in 1947. He invited Inge and Haas to work for Magnum. She subsequently moved to Paris, working as an editor for Magnum. But she also began publishing as a photographer under pseudonym until she became assistant to Henri Cartier-Bresson. In 1960 during the shooting of John Huston’s "Misfits" – she did the stills – she met Arthur Miller, scriptwriter of the film, and in 1962 they married. After several years in New York they moved to his old farm house in Conneticut, a few hours away from New York. They have a daughter – Rebecca – who has also become known as an artist and actress. Inge’s and Arthur’s marriage is one of the rare cases of an artist relationship which also brought forth unusual common projects – such as books about their travels to Russia and China. While Arthur is still working as a play writer, Inge has become renowned mainly for her portraits of famous artists. She has had a series of important exhibitions of her work all over the world and was awarded the Austrian National Award for Photography in the beginning of 1992. Sabine Eckhard’s portrait approaches Inge Morath’s work and life from a very personal point of view. Inge is accompanied at her home and studio in Conneticut with Arthur Miller, in New York and Paris with some of her illustrious colleagues such as Henri Cartier-Bresson, Elliott Erwitt and Pierre Gassmann. "Copyright by Inge Morath" is a portrait of a great photographer and extraordinary woman as well as a document of photography after the second World War