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Camorra
© Todos Contentos Y Yo Tambien Napoli / Rai Cinema
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AUTEUR(S)-RÉALISATEUR(S)

Francesco Patierno

SON

Matteo Bendinelli

MONTAGE

Maria Fantastica Valmori

PRODUCTION / DIFFUSION

Todos Contentos Y Yo Tambien Napoli, Rai Cinema

ORGANISME(S) DÉTENTEUR(S) ou DÉPOSITAIRE(S)

Gioia Avvantaggiato - GA&A

ISAN : non renseigné - en savoir plus
COMMENT VISIONNER CE FILM ?

Pas de résumé français disponible

The film is a historical and socio-anthropological portrait of the provincial capital of Campania, Naples, and the organised crime that afflicts it, and is the fruit of months of rummaging through the treasures of Rai Teche, the archives of the Italian state broadcaster. Surprising vintage footage, most of it never shown before, finds a visceral connection with the original music and songs written by Meg.
Camorra delves into the soul of an inscrutable city.
The film clips tell the story of the growth of the crime syndicate between the 1960s and 1990s: from its subordination to the Mafia, which controlled the contraband of cigarettes in Campania after the war, until the advent of Raffaele Cutolo, who unified the bands of extortionists into a single, large armed and economic power.

“In Naples, we say, ‘You lose your life trying to make a living.’” In archive footage, a Neapolitan explains why the city is such a hotbed of crime: it’s a city of poverty and unemployment, the class system is still firmly in place, and the local government is corrupt. For decades this has provided fertile ground for a wide range of criminal activity.
Francesco Patierno delved into the Italian national public broadcaster’s archives, Rai Teche, and discovered news programs, background reports and interviews that reveal what went wrong in this port city. Using unique journalistic material dating from the 1960s to the mid-1990s combined with a specially composed score by the Italian singer-songwriter Meg, Patierno has reconstructed the socioeconomic history of a lost city where the use of violence doesn’t make you an outcast but a hero. Even teenagers talk openly about their track record on the street. Yet at another point in the film, a criminal boss addresses the camera and shamelessly denies any involvement. The film avoids the present and is devoid of moralization or judgment. Nevertheless, Camorra holds up a mirror that reveals an uncomfortable reflection.

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