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I Hope I'm Loud When I'm Dead
© Denna Cartamkhoob / Somesuch
1/2
AUTEUR(S)-RÉALISATEUR(S)

Beatrice Gibson

IMAGE

Sean Price Williams, Ben Rivers, Beatrice Gibson, Nick Gordon Smith

SON

Adam Gutch, Chu-Li Shewring

MONTAGE

Beatrice Gibson, Ben Crooks

PRODUCTION / DIFFUSION

Denna Cartamkhoob, Somesuch

ORGANISME(S) DÉTENTEUR(S) ou DÉPOSITAIRE(S)

Lux

ISAN : non renseigné - en savoir plus
COMMENT VISIONNER CE FILM ?
  • Royaume-Uni | 2018 | 21 minutes | 16 mm & DV transferred to HD
  • Un film de Beatrice Gibson

Pas de résumé français disponible

Reframing our current political moment in intimate terms, Gibson’s urgent snapshot of worldwide social calamities doubles as a document of practical resistance. In Gibson’s hands, the music of Pauline Oliveros and the words of poets CA Conrad and Eileen Myles imbue images of street riots, the Grenfell Fire, and the mass refugee migration with complexity and grace.

"The furious incantation in the title of Beatrice Gibson's new film comes from a poem by CAConrad, who in the company of his fellow poet Eileen Myles reads excerpts of his own works on the evening when Donald Trump is sworn in as the new President of the United States. An incantation that urges us to protest, and which makes the reading itself - and the scenes on both sides of it - a riotous ritual. Like a message in a bottle in a dark sea, Gibson's own film is also clearly addressed to its own callous moment in history, and to her children. The experience of parenthood gives the daily news stream a special, tragic weight. But where there is noise, there is hope. Gibson's expressive and aphoristic film works its way towards an unforgettable homage to the final scene of Claire Denis's film Beau Travail."
(CPH:DOX)


Reframing our current political moment in intimate terms, Gibson’s urgent snapshot of worldwide social calamities doubles as a document of practical resistance. In Gibson’s hands, the music of Pauline Oliveros and the words of poets CA Conrad and Eileen Myles imbue images of street riots, the Grenfell Fire, and the mass refugee migration with complexity and grace.

"The furious incantation in the title of Beatrice Gibson's new film comes from a poem by CAConrad, who in the company of his fellow poet Eileen Myles reads excerpts of his own works on the evening when Donald Trump is sworn in as the new President of the United States. An incantation that urges us to protest, and which makes the reading itself - and the scenes on both sides of it - a riotous ritual. Like a message in a bottle in a dark sea, Gibson's own film is also clearly addressed to its own callous moment in history, and to her children. The experience of parenthood gives the daily news stream a special, tragic weight. But where there is noise, there is hope. Gibson's expressive and aphoristic film works its way towards an unforgettable homage to the final scene of Claire Denis's film Beau Travail."
(CPH:DOX)

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