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Robolove
© Nikolaus Geyrhalter Filmproduktion GmbH
1/1
AUTEUR(S)-RÉALISATEUR(S)

Maria Arlamovsky

IMAGE

Sebastian Arlamovsky

SON

Andreas Hamza

MONTAGE

Maria Arlamovsky, Sebastian Arlamovsky, Emily Artmann, Alexander Gugitscher

MUSIQUE ORIGINALE

Andreas Hamza, Boris Hauf

PRODUCTION / DIFFUSION

Nikolaus Geyrhalter Filmproduktion GmbH - NGF

ORGANISME(S) DÉTENTEUR(S) ou DÉPOSITAIRE(S)

Nikolaus Geyrhalter Filmproduktion GmbH - NGF

ISAN : non renseigné - en savoir plus

Pas de résumé français disponible

A few decades ago robots still looked like moving toolboxes. This has changed radically. Today’s humanoids not only look like people, they can roll their eyes and wink, too. In this film, they come mainly from Japan, Korea and the U.S. Ishiguro Hiroshi is a pioneer in the construction of such artificial humans. He even built himself a twin. But most of these new creatures are female and, in line with their creators’ fantasies, endowed with the attributes desired in a patriarchal society: “It’s going to be a woman, so the smile is important,” one of the developers instructs his assistant. Almost all the androids have a dollface bearing a none-too-intelligent and submissive expression, saucer eyes and a slightly opened mouth. Only at the Terasem company in Vermont a talking woman’s bust of more mature age called “BINA 48” is supposed to mimic human behaviour emotionally, too.
It’s not surprising that the developers attribute all kinds of world-improving qualities to their creatures and spurn potential criticism in advance. Or are human beings just machines anyway, as Ishiguro claims? This closely observing film without comments by Maria Arlamovsky offers deep insights into this Brave New World, allowing us to form our own judgement.
(Silvia Hallensleben)

A few decades ago robots still looked like moving toolboxes. This has changed radically. Today’s humanoids not only look like people, they can roll their eyes and wink, too. In this film, they come mainly from Japan, Korea and the U.S. Ishiguro Hiroshi is a pioneer in the construction of such artificial humans. He even built himself a twin. But most of these new creatures are female and, in line with their creators’ fantasies, endowed with the attributes desired in a patriarchal society: “It’s going to be a woman, so the smile is important,” one of the developers instructs his assistant. Almost all the androids have a dollface bearing a none-too-intelligent and submissive expression, saucer eyes and a slightly opened mouth. Only at the Terasem company in Vermont a talking woman’s bust of more mature age called “BINA 48” is supposed to mimic human behaviour emotionally, too.
It’s not surprising that the developers attribute all kinds of world-improving qualities to their creatures and spurn potential criticism in advance. Or are human beings just machines anyway, as Ishiguro claims? This closely observing film without comments by Maria Arlamovsky offers deep insights into this Brave New World, allowing us to form our own judgement.
(Silvia Hallensleben)

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